Vacation Rentals by Owner
FRBO black divider
Vacation Rentals by Owner
home for for rent by owner vacation rental united states vacation rental international
rental owner log on Rental Owners Sign Up Here vacation rental by owner disclaimer
Vacation Rentals by Owner

Washington Holiday and Vacation Rentals for Rent By Owner

Vacation Rentals by Owner
Vacation Rentals by Owner

*Belfair
Title/Location: Waterfront Cabin at Sister`s Point, 12 miles from town of Belfair, 90 minutes from Seattle by freeway or ferry.Corliss Hood Canal Cabin
Property Type: Cabin   Accommodates: 4   Bedrooms: 1   Baths: 1

*Bremerton
Title/Location: Bremerton, Kitsap Peninsula, 1hr to Seattle, 1.3hr to Sea-Tac, 1.5hr to Olympic Nat`l Pk
Property Type: House   Accommodates: 10   Bedrooms: 3   Baths: 2

*Mt. Baker/Glacier
Title/Location: Snowater (Mtn. Boy 203) - Located in the Mt. Baker National Forest along the Nooksack River. 1/4 East of the town of Glacier, WA on the Mt. Baker Hwy.
Property Type: Condominium   Accommodates: 4   Bedrooms: 1   Baths: 1

*Mt. Baker/Glacier
Title/Location: Your Getaway at the Gateway, Located In The Prestigeous Snowline Community, This Chalet Offers Unsurpassed Views Of The Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. See Snowcapped Peaks In The Winter, Lush Green Foilage In Spring & Summer, And Magnificent Colors In The Fall
Property Type: Cabin   Accommodates: 6   Bedrooms: 3   Baths: 2

*Roslyn
Title/Location: Roslyn, 75 miles from Sea-Tac Airport via beautiful snoqualimie pass
Property Type: House   Accommodates: 6   Bedrooms: 2   Baths: 1

*Walla Walla
Title/Location: Walla Walla, 13 miles from Walla Walla airport, 3000 private Mt. Acres
Property Type: Cottage   Accommodates: 12   Bedrooms: 3   Baths: 1

This page has been accessed Hit Counter times. Last counter reset - 12/20/08.

Vacation Rentals by Owner

Washington Holiday and Vacation Travel Information

Description

Washington is teeming with natural attractions. The state is split into eastern and western regions by the Cascade Mountain Range. West of the mountains lies the coastal area of Washington, which includes the largest city in the state, Seattle. Olympic National Park lies in this region on the Olympic Peninsula. The park preserves most of the Olympic Mountains, which harbor 60 glaciers and many miles of 60 miles of wild and scenic ocean beaches. Other attractions in this region are the San Juan Islands and extensive waterways used for recreation. The eastern slope of the state includes the headwaters of the Columbia river, which leads southward to form the border with Oregon. A few smaller mountain ranges dot the northern and southern areas of western Washington, with the Columbia Basin claiming most of the area. This region lies in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains. The northwest corner of the state contains Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. The lake extends 150 miles and was created by the Grand Coulee Dam.

Recreation

Recreation opportunities in Washington state will please the skilled mountaineer and the novice hiker. Experienced individuals looking for a challenging climb can attempt to summit Mount Rainier. The National Forests that line the Cascades provide endless outdoor opportunities. Lake Roosevelt, in the east, will satisfy the desires of boaters, anglers, water skiers and sailors.

Climate

Washington's climate varies greatly between regions and with changing elevation. The Cascade Range splits the state and alters weather patterns. Climate at lower elevations west of the Cascades is generally temperate due to the coastal influence, with extreme temperatures rare. The Cascades and Western Washington receive high amounts of precipitation, consisting of mostly rain at the lower elevations but heavy winter snow at the higher elevations. The peaks of the Cascade Range and Olympic Mountains remain snow covered throughout the year.

Averaging only about 12 inches of precipitation annually, Eastern Washington is significantly drier than Western Washington. Eastern Washington also experiences much greater temperature extremes with summer temperatures often reaching 90 degrees F at the lower elevations and winter temperatures commonly dropping well below freezing.

Location

Washington State is located in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

Description - The Columbia Plateau first formed as an immense sea of prehistoric, volcanic basalt flow. It is the second largest basalt plateau in the world, but the term "plateau" belies the dramatic cliffs and canyons carved by ice age floods. Towering rock formations and steep gorges straddle the great Columbia River and its tributaries. Orchards of apple and pear form green quilts on the wide, semiarid terrain. If you think of Washington only in terms of the damp forests and cityscapes of Puget Sound, you will be amazed at the sculpted beauty of this high desert land.

Attractions - Throughout the Columbia River Plateau region, you can be as active or sedate as you want at any given moment. Moses Lake, for instance, is a haven for boaters, water sports enthusiasts and sun worshippers. Golfers, cyclists and road trippers alike take advantage of the almost ever-present sunshine and expansive vistas. Gingko Petrified Forest State Park is a geological window to a prehistoric world.

If you want to see and hear a symphony of wildlife, join the thousands of waterfowl that visit the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge. Mild winters and abundant water draw great blue heron, sandhill cranes and tundra swans, among other precious, migratory species. You may even spot one of the relatively numerous but extremely shy coyotes that scamper amid the shrubs and high grass. Potholes State Park, named for the rather shallow lakes created during Pleistocene flooding, provides another easily accessible area to view rare wildlife and enjoy boating, fishing, hiking or picnicking.

Visitors can drive or boat through sun-soaked, red canyons of columnar basalt that line Banks Lake. Fish or hike surrounded by spectacular monuments of rock outlined against a dark blue sky. This is a photographer's heaven. Just downstream, relax in the legendary, healing waters and magic mud of Soap Lake. You'll find the people and the accommodations equally warm and friendly in this laid back area.

Recreation - The Columbia River Plateau region provides visitors with many recreational opportunities. Visitors will find hiking, biking, camping, boating, bird watching, fishing, golfing, skiing, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - The Columbia River Plateau region is located in the heart of Washington. The region can be accessed via I-90.

Description - The North Cascade Range is a towering mass of granite spires and prehistoric glaciers. Amid these jagged peaks, you can walk in the quiet of ancient forests, swim in seas of wildflower and peer into the glass of alpine lakes. This is sacred country for casual hikers and extreme mountaineers alike.

Attractions - The North Cascade mountains represent only one part of the beautiful North Cascades region. Beside the range's western slopes, lies the lush Skagit valley, where hundreds of bald eagles stop to rest together each winter, and feed on exhausted salmon. The Skagit Valley is also home to the world's largest tulip fields, where, in the summer, miles of color paint the earth and can be viewed from bike, car or small plane. Even the waters of Puget Sound are just an hour's drive from the mountain shoulders of North Cascades National Park.

To the east lies the drier, sunnier Methow Valley, a cross-country skiing paradise, with countless miles of pristine trails and quaint houses to rent. A little farther east, the vast hills and glades of the Okanogan National Forest tempt skiers in the winter and outdoor explorers in the warmer months. Grizzlies, wolves and elk make their homes in the thick stands of ponderosa pine that cover peaks up to 8,000 feet high.

Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, nestled in the high foothills of the southeastern part of the North Cascades region, includes the state's largest lake.

Recreation - Recreational opportunities abound in the North Cascades region. Along with camping, hiking and biking, visitors will enjoy mountain climbing, horseback riding, white water rafting and kayaking, fishing, bird watching, skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling, and snowshoeing.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - The North Cascades region described here begins at the western Canadian border and stretches south along the North Cascade mountain range. The region can be accessed via I-90, U.S. Hwy. 2, State Hwy. 20, and State Hwy. 542.

Description - The vast and roadless Olympic National Park combined with Olympic National Forest, totals more than 2 million acres of protected nature. Ecological and geological extremes coexist in close proximity. Whether you're equipped to scale the sharpest peak, or simply seek the peace of a groomed path to a waterfall in the forest, you must explore it for yourself. Deer and bear are plentiful and the Roosevelt elk population is the largest anywhere. Bald eagles ride the skies and salmon fight their way upstream from the Pacific. You can trace their journey from the ocean, along a river through the rain forest, all the way to the foot of the blue glaciers of Mount Olympus.

Along the shore, monumental sea stacks stand oblivious to the power of the Pacific. Jade-green sea urchins, orange starfish and myriad other species take refuge in delicate tide pools. These are the last wilderness beaches in the lower 48 states. In the rain forest, ferns grow to prehistoric size and moss hangs like drapery from the branches of ancient trees. Here in the worlds only coniferous rain forests, you'll find the worlds largest specimens of western cedar and Sitka spruce. In the alpine areas, rugged mountains wear wildflowers and rise in a blink from near sea level to six and seven thousand feet.

Attractions - When you take the ferry from downtown Seattle, you cross Elliott Bay and land in picturesque Kitsap County. As a day outing or as a stopover on your way west, the Kitsap Peninsula is home to many distinctive shops and galleries, fine restaurants and cozy inns with spectacular views; the Olympic Mountains to the west and Mount Rainier and the city skyline to the east. On Hood Canal, a fjord between the Kitsap and Olympic Peninsulas, the summer sun warms the channel waters for swimming and blackberries grow fat on bluffs and roadsides.

Recreation - Activities on the peninsulas are as diverse as the spectacular landscape. In the same day, its possible to go snowboarding in the morning and scuba diving in the afternoon. Traverse a glacier; soak your body in a hot spring; then visit a local winery, art gallery or unique artisan's shop. Go whitewater rafting through the Elwah River Valley; then go llama trekking into the high-country. Or, stroll for miles on a natural beach, stopping to examine life teeming in the tide pools. You can fish from the shore or try your skills on the deep seas. Climb Mount Olympus or walk a gentle trail in the surreal green of a rain forest. Wherever you explore, watch for the black bear and noble Roosevelt elk.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - Visitors can reach the Olympic and Kitsap Peninsulas by several different routes: take a car ferry from Seattle, Edmonds, Whidbey Island, or Victoria, B.C., or drive around through Tacoma or Olympia. The scenic Olympic Loop (Highway 101) circumnavigates Olympic National Park and provides access to the entire peninsula region.

Description - The northeast region of Washington is still unspoiled, with vast tracts of coniferous forest and dense mountain terrain. But easy access to culture, as well as wilderness, is attracting ever-increasing numbers of visitors and transplants who discover this areas combination of natural beauty and understated sophistication.

The rugged, rolling landscape emerged from the last ice age about 10,000 years ago. Animals and plants followed the retreating glaciers, and humans were not far behind. Native Americans probably began hunting, fishing, and gathering in the area about 9,000 years ago. The Kettle Falls Interpretive Center features an exhibit depicting life as it existed here for millennia before Europeans arrived. White settlement became established in the late 1800s, attracted by the scenic grandeur and abundant natural resources, and facilitated by the transcontinental linking of the Northern Pacific Railroad.

Attractions - If you want to escape to the backcountry, the emerald stands of Colville National Forest comprise an amazing 1.1 million acres of protected Ponderosa Pine Country. The Sherman Pass National Forest Scenic Byway (Highway 20) takes you over the highest pass in the state, amid what is really the far western extent of the Rocky Mountains. Fir-covered peaks over 7,000 feet tall roll north into Canada and east into Idaho. Hundreds of miles of trails access the Selkirk Mountains, Kettle River Range, and the precious old-growth forests of Salmo-Priest Wilderness. Remember that roads are closed from mid-November to June, so access to trailheads can be limited by winter weather.

Recreation - Recreational opportunities abound in the Ponderosa Pine region. Visitors can rent a houseboat and relax, or cast a line from a lava terrace along a lake shore. Hike amid the ancient pines and search for the last herd of wild caribou. Rafting, kayaking, golfing, photography, mountain climbing, horseback riding, and winter activities are available in this area.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - Ponderosa Pine Country region is located in the northwestern corner of Washington. The region can be accessed via Hwy. 395.

Description - Three major volcanoes; Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens and Mt. Adams rise like immense pyramids from the surrounding hills. On their southern border with Oregon, the Columbia River has carved a great gorge, thousands of feet deep in spots, through the Cascade Range. These three volcanoes and a gorge are quiet but awe-inspiring neighbors to the regions booming cities. From Vancouver, Washington in the south, to Seattle and Tacoma in the north, this is Volcano Country.

Attractions - The year 2000 marks the twentieth anniversary of the eruption of Mount St. Helens, which created the greatest landslide in recorded history. Visitors to the mountain can now see the green of rebirth emerging from the ash amid a surreal moonscape of forests blown over in the blast. Many miles of trails and several informative visitor centers give you different perspectives on the mountain, and on the unbelievable forces that coincided that Sunday morning, May 18, 1980.

Recreation - Climb on the back of a volcano or bike a wooded trail in the shadow of a city skyline. Windsurf with the world's best where the breath of the Pacific is channeled in a great gorge. Explore a lava tube, lie in a bed of wildflowers, talk to ancient trees or cook a meal on a glacier. Ride a river's rage in spring or feel a waterfall's mist on your face.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - Volcano Country region is located south of Seattle along the southern Cascade Mountain range. The region can be accessed via Hwy. 410.

Description - Washington's coast is much more than a beach destination. Native Americans thrived here for thousands of years before Lewis and Clark first sighted the Pacific Ocean. At Fort Canby State Park, you can relive the adventures of Lewis and Clark who completed their quest for the Pacific near this spot almost 200 years ago. Built on a rocky headland, and home to a century-old lighthouse, this interpretive center contains exhaustive journal excerpts, maps and photo-murals of places along the explorers route.

Attractions - Millions of migratory birds annually visit the estuaries and tide flats that make for rich feeding grounds. Bird watchers flock here from all over the world to spy on a cast of characters with names like sandpipers, plover, yellowlegs and marbled godwit, along with brown pelicans and the kingly great blue heron.

Recreation - The Coast region offers numerous coastal activities including boating, kayaking, fishing, bird watching, and whale watching. Camping, hiking, horseback riding, wildlife viewing, golfing, and kite flying activities are also available within the region.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - The Coast region described here encompasses the area from the Oregon border north to the Olympic Peninsula. The region can be accessed from Olympia via Hwy. 12 and 101.

Description - The Island region includes Whidbey Island, Camano Island, Fidalgo Island and the San Juan Islands. Many islands and islets make up the San Juan Islands, but it's the four main islands, Lopez, Shaw, Orcas and San Juan, that are accessible to visitors. Highways connect Camano Island and Fidalgo Island to the mainland. The Washington State Ferry system serves the San Juans, as well as providing an alternative route to Whidbey and Fidalgo. Fidalgo itself is also a main point of departure to the San Juans and Victoria, British Columbia.

Attractions - Aboard a ferry to the islands of Washington, you can look back at the white pyramid of Mount Baker standing at the edge of the continent. Eagles carve circles in the sky above. Orca whales and porpoises feed and play in the lush water below. This legendary archipelago was a gift of the glaciers that covered Washington 15 thousand years ago. It is a refuge for some of the world's most rare and regal species, for humans who seek a respite from their life on land and for artists who find inspiration here. Galleries, vineyards and fine restaurants coexist with some of the tastiest canoeing and kayaking waters along the Pacific Coast.

Orcas Island, the largest and most rugged of the San Juan Islands, boasts the enormous (5175-acre) Moran State Park, including 2,409-foot Mount Constitution, the highest point in the region. From the summit, you can peer out over the entire island chain to Mount Baker and the North Cascades, plus the Canadian Coastal Range. When you're on the trails, watch for eagles and owls perched in the giant, old-growth forest of the park. The San Juans are home to more eagles than any other region of the contiguous states.

Whidbey Island can be reached by driving over the majestic Deception Pass Bridge at the northern tip of the island. As you cross the bridge, look out on the incoming sea, churned and squeezed in a bottleneck of rocky, evergreen bluffs. Whidbey Island is known for its quaint inns; historic towns; white oak forests and Ebey's Landing National Historic Reserve, 17,000 acres of protected nature and historic sites, including 19th century military fortifications and relics of the area's exploration and settlement. Camano Island State Park is a popular escape that encompasses 134 acres of protected forest and more than a mile of coastline.

Lopez Island benefits from being visited less often. The rolling farm roads and woodlands are perfect for biking. A coastline of steep cliffs is interspersed with secluded beaches and coves.

Recreation - The Islands region offers many recreational opportunities. Along with camping and boating, visitors can ride bikes on rolling island roads, kayak into secret coves, watch for whales from the bow of a boat, or hike to a summit and watch the eagles fly above cliffs.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - The Islands region is located northwest of Seattle in Puget Sound. The islands can be reached by ferry and and some by car.

Description - The Palouse represents idyllic America a land of amber waves and warmhearted people. The long, peaceful roads are perfect for bike touring or scenic drives. Rolling fields, punctuated with historic towns, 19th century architecture and remnants of pioneer farms, create a photographers dream. It is one of the richest wheat-growing regions in the world, but the Palouse is far more than just picturesque farm country.

In addition to the mountains, gorges and sprawling agricultural beauty, the Palouse is a place rich in history, dating back more than 10,000 years. Native Americans were here first, then Lewis & Clark passed through nearly two centuries ago on their journey to the mouth of the Columbia. They were likely the first non-indigenous people to set foot in Washington. In the fall of 1805, when westward bound, the Lewis & Clark Expedition arrived at the junction of two great rivers. One was the mighty Snake and it seems they established a camp on the bank of the other, the Clearwater. The expedition also camped on the banks of Patit Creek, a short distance from the Columbia County Courthouse, now newly restored, which remains as the oldest courthouse in the state. Take a walking tour of 83 houses on the National Historic Register or visit the Boomerang Newspaper and Printing Museum, which maintains equipment used by early day printers. This fully operational, antique equipment and the extensive collection of county newspapers provide a unique opportunity to explore and research letterpress printing methods as well as local history.

Attractions - Ride a raft down, and a jet boat up, the Snake River through Hells Canyon, the deepest gorge in North America. Nearby, take in spectacular Palouse Falls, where the Palouse River tumbles 198 feet over layers of basalt lava deposited here during the last Ice Age. Or explore the wilderness of the 1.4 million-acre Umatilla National Forest with its rugged backcountry of peaks and canyons. The forest is ideal for hiking, mountain biking, and horsepacking. Keep your eyes open for Rocky Mountain elk, bighorn sheep, deer, cougar and black bear. If skiing is your passion, shoosh through deep powder (300 annual inches) on the slopes of the nearby Blue Mountains. The second-highest base elevation in the state is found here along with clear skies and luxuriously short lift lines.

Recreation - Recreational opportunities abound in the Palouse region. Visitors will find hiking, biking, camping, horseback riding, boating, bird watching, fishing, golfing, skiing, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - The Palouse region is located in the southeastern corner of Washington. The Palouse can be accessed via Hwy. 26, Hwy. 12 and Hwy. 195.

Description - As you cross the mountains from the west on your way to Wine Country, you emerge from the forest into the naked sun and dry, rippling hills of the Yakima Valley. Stretched out ahead, the Saddle Mountains wear little foliage and the bones of the earth are suddenly visible. The Yakima River cuts through arid Umtanum Ridge lined with gray-green shrubs that hug the dusty skin of the Earth. This is the home of the Yakima Nation whose cultural center welcomes you. A neighboring town even recreates the Old West in murals, some painted in a single day before your eyes. And tucked amid the rolling steppes of this high desert, grow some of the world's most prized fruit and vegetables.

Attractions - Despite the reliable sun, snow melt from the mountains and irrigation from the Columbia River quench the thirst of renowned orchards and vineyards. It's pretty much common knowledge that Washington is the world leader in apple production. But few people are aware that the Yakima Valley also produces 75 percent of the hops grown in the U.S. Or that this same area is becoming famous for the asparagus, peppers, chiles and specialty foods found at roadside stands and farmers markets. In recent years, the wines of the Yakima Valley, Columbia Valley and Walla Walla Valley have become revered internationally, rivaling and even surpassing many of the best California and French wines. Raised in the rich volcanic soil and sharing the same latitude as Bordeaux, France, the wines of Washington win more awards proportional to production than any other wine region in the world. While this region of the state is justifiably famous for its vineyards and wineries, there are equally excellent vineyards and wineries in the Puget Sound and other areas of eastern Washington.

Recreation - Recreational opportunities abound in the Wine Country region. Visitors can raft in the cool waters of a sun-parched river canyon, hike amid the legends of Indian heroes or watch rare waterfowl savor the last wild stretch of the Columbia River. Or visitors can climb a sand dune and peer out over an oasis of orchards and vineyards, hops and vegetables.

Climate - Washington's climate varies with each region. The Cascades split the state and alter weather patterns. The terrain east of the mountains receives significantly less rainfall than that west of the mountains, 12 inches is the annual average. Temperatures in this region are lower during the winter months, because it is landlocked. Frequent winds coming down from the mountains also contribute to the low temperatures of eastern Washington.

Western Washington is temperate, due to the coastal geography. The water is a stabilizing force for the climate, making extreme temperatures rare. The area receives large amounts of rainfall from Pacific storms and some snow during winter months.

The mountains of Washington receive large amounts of water-laden snow from October through May. These peaks remain snow covered throughout the year.

Location - The Wine Country region is located along the Columbia River in southern Washington. The region can be accessed via I-82 and Hwy. 395.