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Vacation Rentals by Owner

Vermont Holiday and Vacation Rentals for Rent By Owner

Vacation Rentals by Owner
Vacation Rentals by Owner

*STOWE
Title/Location: Spect.views w/HOT TUB on deck, Burlington Vt (Airport - Jet Blue) 45 min. Montreal - 2 hrs. Boston 3 hrs. New York 5 hrs.
Property Type: House   Accommodates: 10   Bedrooms: 4   Baths: 3.5

 

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Vacation Rentals by Owner

Vermont Holiday and Vacation Travel Information

Description

Known as one of America's loveliest states, Vermont is the epitome of New England flavor with rolling mountain scenery shadowing beautiful small towns. History abounds amidst the cold trout waters, acres of wilderness and miles of year-round trails. Vermont is also home to America's sixth largest lake, Lake Champlain.

Attractions

Vermont combines a small population, like that of the American West and interesting traditions of New England.

The Green Mountains dissect the state into eastern and western halves. Many of the recreation opportunities available in the state can be found in the Green Mountain National Forest that encompasses the range in southern and central Vermont. Lakes and rivers pervade the state and provide ample facilities for outdoor recreation throughout the year. Lake Champlain, which forms Vermont's northwestern border with New York, is ten miles wide in some areas. The Connecticut River forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont.

Vermont can be split into several regions, that each have a distinct character. The Champlain Valley encompasses the region east of Lake Champlain from the Canadian border to Rutland, Vermont. This is sometimes called the banana belt of the state, due to the temperature moderating effects of the lake. This area contains numerous small communities with loads of New England charm as well as the two largest cities in the state: Burlington and Rutland. Killington Ski Area is one of the largest attractions in the region. It lies east of Rutland. The Grand Isle area, north of Burlington, supports a unique population of Abanaki, French-Canadian and American cultures.

The southern region of the state contains the ski areas of Haystack Mountain, Stratton Mountain and Mt. Snow. Many people come to this region of the state for skiing and never get beyond it. This area contains Brattleboro in the east and Bennington in the west. Both of these towns support several cultural institutions and hold a significant place in American, and Vermont, history.

The central region of the state contains the larger communities of White River Junction, on the New Hampshire border, and Montpelier, the capital city. Interstate 89 dissects this region and provides easy access to the ski areas of Stowe, Sugarbush and Mad River Glen. Several state forests and parks in this region provide ample facilities for outdoor enthusiasts of many interests.

The Northeast Kingdom is the least populated region of the state. Many residents will tell you, "life in the Northeast Kingdom is the way Vermont used to be." (The state has recently seen a significant rise in population.) This area lies east of the Cold Hollow Mountains, west of the Connecticut River and south of Quebec, Canada. More artists, musicians and writers live in this part of Vermont than the others combined. Natural areas are plentiful with the terrain including mountains, rivers, lakes and meadows.

Recreation

Visitors and residents can enjoy a myriad of recreation opportunities in this state's natural areas. The Green Mountains provide Easterners from many states with a plethora of skiable terrain. The Catamount Ski Trail contains 280 miles of cross-country trails. The mountains also harbor the Long and Appalachian Trails, two well-maintained long distance trails.

The numerous lakes and rivers of the state provide water-oriented recreation opportunities throughout the year. Ice fishing on Lake Champlain is a long standing tradition for many Vermonters. Fly fishing, swimming and sailing are very popular pursuits during the warmer months.

Climate

Vermont's climate varies somewhat depending on region. Generally, the state experiences mild summers with temperatures rarely reaching 90 degrees F. Often summer lows will dip to 50 degrees and by late August temperatures begin to cool. Signs of spring are evident in the Champlain Valley by late March, although the high country begins mud season at this time and doesn't get a full thaw until late April. The mountainous regions of the state have seen snow fall in every month, so be prepared for cooler temperatures if staying in those areas.

Winters can be harsh and long in this northern state. Snow is likely to fall anytime between September and April. Humidity makes winter weather seem bitter and usually a few weeks during the winter see night time temperature below zero. The average winter temperature is 20 degrees F with highs reaching into the forties on warm days.

Location

Vermont is located in the northeastern are of the United States nestled between New York on the west, Canada on the north, New Hampshire on the east and Massachusetts on the south.

Lovely Central Vermont is home to the state's capital, The New England Culinary Institute, the worlds largest granite industry and the recreation rich Green Mountains. There are rugged mountaintops to secluded streams for enjoying bird-watching, berry picking, paddleboating, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling and more. Visitors will find seventeen state and twenty-nine private campgrounds, early 40 covered bridges and many historical sights including the American Precision Museum, Billings Farm and Museum, Chimney Point State Historic Site, Dana House, Ureka Schoolhouse State Historic Site, Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, Justin Smith Morrill Homestead State Historic Site, Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, Middlebury College Museum of Art, Montshire Museum of Science, Mt. Independence State Historic Site, New England Maple Museum, Old Constitution House State Historic Site, President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site, Rokeby Museum, Sheldon Museum, Vermont Institute of Natural Science and Raptor Center, Vermont Marble Exhibit and the Wilson Castle.

Attractions - Central Vermont is home to the pristine capitol city of Montpelier which is nestled amidst beautiful lakes and streams running through rolling hills. Golf courses and ski resorts abound. There is even a maple sugar farm just north of the capitol city. The New England Culinary Institute makes its home in the region as well. Just below the capitol city is Barre which boasts a population of over 10,000 due to being the granite center of the world. Farther south in the region, the beautiful Green Mountains are a year-round playground destination for folks of all ages. Historical sites and museums are sprinkled throughout including American Precision Museum, Billings Farm and Museum, Chimney Point State Historic Site, Dana House, Ureka Schoolhouse State Historic Site, Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, Justin Smith Morrill Homestead State Historic Site, Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, Middlebury College Museum of Art, Montshire Museum of Science, Mt. Independence State Historic Site, New England Maple Museum, Old Constitution House State Historic Site, President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site, Rokeby Museum, Sheldon Museum, Vermont Institute of Natural Science and Raptor Center, Vermont Marble Exhibit and the Wilson Castle.

Recreation - With thousands of acres and hundreds of miles of trails within Central Vermont, Green Mountains National Forest offers endless opportunities for people of all ages and abilities to enjoy year-round outdoor recreation. There are rugged mountain tops to secluded streams for enjoying bird-watching, berry picking, paddleboating, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling and more.

Nearly 40 covered bridges, many on the National Register of Historic Places may be enjoyed along the country roads and pastoral highways of central Vermont.

Seventeen state and twenty-nine private campgrounds offer overnight facilities for outdoor enthusiasts. Hiking, picnicking, swimming and a varied of water sports are enjoyed at both.

Climate - Winter daytime temperatures average between 16 and 18 degrees Fahrenheit (between -9 and -8 Celsius). Summer daytime temperatures average between 68 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit (20 and 21 Celsius). Much of the state's precipitation is the result of snow, particularly throughout the mountains. Central Vermont has diverse precipitation totals ranging from 40 to 44 inches (102 and 112 centimeters) in the center area of the region decreasing to less than 36 inches (91 centimeters) along the state lines of New York and New Hampshire.

Location - The Central Vermont Travel Region falls of course within the central portion of the state, stretching between the states of New York and New Hampshire. The northern border is a zig-zag across the state running below the city of Burlington, above the state capitol of Montpelier and dropping below the city of St. Johnsbury. The southern boundary is a fairly straight horizontal line running from North Rupert to Weston, slightly dropping to Londonderry and ending at Charlestown.

Description - Northern Vermont is a diverse region offering wonderful trophy fishing in Lake Champlain to fabulous downhill skiing in Stowe to remote hiking along the Long Trail. A smorgasbord of year-round outdoor recreation is often minutes away from your stay.

Attractions - From farmlands where beef, dairy cattle and potatoes are grown to bustling resorts towns like Stowe and over to the headwaters of the Connecticut River, Northern Vermont has many sights to offer the visitor. There are over 25 covered bridges that dot the landscape enroute to attractions such as The Bennington Museum, Birds of Vermont Museum, Bread and Puppet Theater Museum, Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium, Homestead of Ethan Allen, Hyde Log Cabin, The John Strong Dar Mansion, The Old Round Church, The Old Stone House Museum, President Chester A. Arthur State Historic Site, Robert Hull Fleming Museum, Shelburne Farms and Museum, St. Anne's Shrine, St. Johnsbury Athenaeum Art Gallery, Underwater Historic Preserves and the Vermont Studio Center.

Recreation - Northern Vermont offers endless opportunities for people of all ages and abilities to enjoy year-round outdoor recreation. From the freshwaters of the United States' sixth largest lake, Lake Champlain to the Cold Hollow and Lowell Mountains people enjoy year-round recreation including hiking, mountain biking, scenic driving, viewing wildlife, whitewater boating, downhill and cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, hunting and fishing.

Climate - Winter daytime temperatures in the lower half of the Northern Vermont region averages 14 to 16 degrees Fahrenheit (-10 to -9 Celsius). The upper half of this region experiences winter temperatures ranging below 14 degrees Fahrenheit (below -10 Celsius). Summer daytime temperatures are cooler along the western area of Lake Champlain averaging 66 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit (19 to 21 Celsius). The central area of this region expects temperatures from 66 to 68 degrees Fahrenheit (19 to 20 Celsius) with the eastern area of this region experiencing the coolest summer time temperatures of less than 66 degrees Fahrenheit (below 19 Celsius). The yearly precipitation for the Northern Vermont Travel Region varies from less than 36 inches (91 centimeters) along the western line to more than 44 inches (112 centimeters) along the eastern border of New Hampshire and Canada.

Location - The southern border for the Northern Vermont Travel Region is a zig-zag across the state running below the city of Burlington, above the state capitol of Montpelier and dropping below the city of St. Johnsbury. The western boundary is Lake Champlain, the northern boundary is Quebec and the eastern boundary is New Hampshire.

Description - Southern Vermont is also known as the Places in History Travel Region due to the historical significance prior to the Revolutionary War and beyond. Ethan Allen was a fiery patriot from Old Bennington who devised one of the first and most important victories of the Revolutionary War. Rudyard Kipling spent most of his fruitful years in Brattleboro, Vermont. Arlington houses the most comprehensive displays of American Illustrator, Norman Rockwell, who depicted everyday life in the paintings of small-town people.

Outdoor recreation is featured at Green Mountains National Forest offering miles of hiking trails, mountain bike roads, warm and coldwater fishing opportunities, camping, sightseeing and more. Seven state operated campgrounds are also within this lower region of Vermont.

Attractions - History is depicted throughout the region on a battlefields, museums and historic buildings. Most notably are Ethan Allen who devised plans and successfully conquered one of the first major battles of the American Revolution. Then there is Rudyard Kipling who while living in Brattleboro wrote Many Inventions (1893), A Matter of Fact and Jungle Book (1894) and The Second Jungle Book (1895). He is remembered as the first English writer to receive the Nobel Prize for literature. Norman Rockwell, the American illustrator is remembered at the Norman Rockwell Exhibition in Arlington.

Nearly a dozen historic covered bridges grace the countryside and towns. The American Museum of Fly Fishing, Bennington Battle Monument, Daniel Webster Memorial, Farrar-Mansur House Museum, Hildene - a Georgian Revival Mansion, Old First Church and Park-McCullough House are among the many attractions in The Places of History Travel Region.

Recreation - With thousands of acres and hundreds of miles of trails within Southern Vermont, Green Mountains National Forest offers endless opportunities for people of all ages and abilities to enjoy year-round outdoor recreation. There are rugged mountain tops to secluded streams for enjoying bird watching, berry picking, paddleboating, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling and more. In addition, over 200 years of history offer accessibility to building, battlefields and museums.

Climate - Winter daytime temperatures average above 18 degrees Fahrenheit (above -8 Celsius). Summer daytime temperatures average above 70 degrees Fahrenheit (above 21 Celsius). Much of the state's precipitation is the result of snow, particularly throughout the mountains. Southern Vermont has an average precipitation of more than 44 inches (more than 112 centimeters). However, along the eastern boundary of this region, precipitation drops between 36 and 40 inches (91 to 102 centimeters).

Location - Southern Vermont is located in the lower third of Vermont bordering the states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, New York and the Vermont counties of Rutland and Windsor.