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Ohio Holiday and Vacation Rentals for Rent By Owner

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Ohio Holiday and Vacation Travel Information

Travel Information Description

During the Ice Age several glaciers covered all of Ohio except the southeastern part of the state. The separate glacial movements resulted in the creation of four separate land regions: The Great Lakes Plains, the Till Plains, the Appalachian Plateau, and the Bluegrass Region.

Ohio boasts more than 44,000 miles of rivers and streams flowing either south into the Ohio River or north into Lake Erie. The Ohio River flows more than 450 miles along Ohio's southern borders. Lake Erie covers over 3,400 square miles with the International Line of the United States and Canada stretching about 20 miles north of the Ohio shore.

Forests encompass about a fourth of Ohio's landmass with the majority of the forest being comprised of hardwoods including black walnuts, maples, ash and oak. Common shrubs included the colorful dogwood and azalea. Common wildflowers include blazing stars, anemones, blue sages, Indian pipes, and wild indigos.

White-tailed deer are the dominant large wild animal of Ohio. Raccoons, red foxes, skunks, muskrats, and opossums have significant numbers. Several hundred bird species inhabit, nest or migrate in the midwestern state. Native fish species include bluegill, walleye, pike, perch, catfish, muskie, and bass.

Attractions

Ohio is rich in Native American and U.S. history. Its 73 state parks and various nationally-administered sites preserve historic and natural resources. Northern Ohio boasts a shoreline of nearly 200 miles along Lake Erie. State Parks and two major metropolitan areas, Cleveland and Toledo, lie along the lake. The Lake Erie shoreline also harbors Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial, commemorating peace with Canada, and James A. Garfield National Historic Site, preserving historic structures associated with the 20th President. South of Cleveland along the Cuyahoga River is the newly defined Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Southern Ohio supports thousands of acres of farmlands as well as the cities of Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati. The Ohio River forms the southern border of the state. Access to the river for recreation purposes is available at numerous points along its lengthy path. Large lakes in southwestern Ohio provide opportunities for fishing, boating and swimming. Hopewell Culture National Historical Park in south central Ohio protects the mounds and artifacts of the Hopewell people, who lived in the region 1,800 years ago. The Wayne National Forest occupies nearly 200,000 acres of rolling hills and forest in the southeastern area of the state.

Recreation

Ohio's public lands support camping, hiking, backpacking, horseback riding and picnicking among other pursuits. Its lakes and rivers offer excellent fishing, boating and swimming to visitors and residents alike.

Please note that the Buckeye Trail is listed independent from any agency, while segments of the North Country National Scenic Trail are outlined within Wayne National Forest.

Climate

This state has four distinct seasons and a brilliant fall foliage display in it southern woods during mid October. Winter lasts from December through February with average temperatures near 25 degrees F. Low temperatures dip to single digits, but do not often drop below zero. Northern regions of the state receive average snowfall amounts of 55 inches, while the central and southern regions of the state receive lesser amounts with averages near 30 inches. This difference is caused by lake-affect moisture patterns.

Spring temperatures begin to warm the landscapes of Ohio by mid March and are in full swing by April. Temperatures range from 40 through 70 degrees F through the spring months. This season often brings the most rainfall, before the drying heat of summer. Summer can be extremely hot and humid in the interior of Ohio. Temperatures reach above 90 degrees F frequently through July and August. Cooler fall temperatures don't reach the region until mid to late September. This is a pleasant time to visit as the air is crisp with low humidity levels. Ohio's annual precipitation usually reaches slightly above 50 inches.

Location

The Buckeye State is a midwestern state bordered by Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania.

Buckeye Trail

Description - A designated Millennium Legacy Trail, the Buckeye Trail is divided into 24 sections each named for an area or specific feature. Founded in 1959 by the Buckeye Trail Association, nearly 1,300 miles of trail travel the state stretching from Mentor Headlands Beach on Lake Erie to Eden Park in Cincinnati. It touches 40 of Ohio's 88 counties with no major population center lying more than 75 miles from any point along the trail.

Offering sights of Ohio's most splendid historic and scenic areas, the trail extends over abandoned railroads and former canal towpaths, through forested and grassy public lands, and into quiet towns and bustling urban areas.

The trail is a cooperative effort with the following entities: The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, the Ohio Historical Society, the U.S. Forest Service, the Muskingum and Miami Conservancy Districts, many local public agencies, and private land owners. As a result, the Buckeye Trail is free to the trailblazer.

Attractions - The long distance Buckeye Trail travels over glaciated and unglaciated terrain, across open grasslands, alongside golden cornfields, and across narrow woodland lanes. Trailblazers can discover Ohio's abandoned railways, its historic homesteads, and one of the country's earliest transportation routes - the towpath canal. Serving as a link to other long distance trails in America including the North Country National Scenic Trail and the American Discovery Trail, users are offered endless miles of exploration where hikers, bicycles, horses, and cross-country skiers are welcome. Primarily maintained by volunteers, the trail is blazed with 2" wide by 6" high blue markers.

The Buckeye Trail Association has divided the trail into 24 separate tracts with descriptions and facilities identified for each. Details include campsites, potable water, emergency medical, grocery stores, seasonal festivals, natural features, wildlife facts and trail alerts. For details about the segments and their accompanying facilities write to Buckeye Trail Association, P. O. Box 254, Worthington, OH 43085.

Recreation - Hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, and cross-country skiing are the main uses along the 1,300-mile trail. Facilities near the long distance trail include food service, camping, potable water, emergency medical help, and outdoor outfitters.

Climate - This state has four distinct seasons and a brilliant fall foliage display in it southern woods during mid October. Winter lasts from December through February with average temperatures near 25 degrees F. Low temperatures dip to single digits, but do not often drop below zero. Northern regions of the state receive average snowfall amounts of 55 inches, while the central and southern regions of the state receive lesser amounts with averages near 30 inches. This difference is caused by lake-affect moisture patterns.

Spring temperatures begin to warm the landscapes of Ohio by mid March and are in full swing by April. Temperatures range from 40 through 70 degrees F through the spring months. This season often brings the most rainfall, before the drying heat of summer. Summer can be extremely hot and humid in the interior of Ohio. Temperatures reach above 90 degrees F frequently through July and August. Cooler fall temperatures don't reach the region until mid to late September. This is a pleasant time to visit as the air is crisp with low humidity levels. Ohio's annual precipitation usually reaches slightly above 50 inches.

Location - The Buckeye Trail encircles the state entering 40 of Ohio's 88 counties.

Ohio Scenic By-Ways

CanalWay Ohio Scenic Byway- This route is thoroughly rich in historical sites and in opportunities for hiking, biking, and water sports.

Land of the Cross-Tipped Churches Scenic Byway- This level farming region unfolds an array of cross-tipped churches, all of which are on the National Register.

Maumee Valley Scenic Byway- The river valley retains its natural charm because of its small towns, canal paths, forts, and Indian monuments. The Maumee is a State Recreational and Scenic River.

Miami & Erie Canal Scenic Byway- This byway was developed around the Miami and Erie Canal which operated between 1840 and 1860. Consequently, much of the history and recreation associated with this route is related to the Canal and its history.

Morgan County Scenic Byway- The foothills of the Appalachian Mountains are a perfect setting for this byway's rustic beauty. It's 'rustic beauty' is embodied in its covered and iron bridges, wildlife areas, historic districts, and state parks.

National Road- The Ohio portion of the National Road is 225 miles long and it extends from Bridgeport to the Indiana border.

Ohio River Scenic Route - Ohio- The Ohio River Scenic Route passes through 14 counties and encompasses the birthplaces of three U.S. presidents. The byway also follows the river, allowing travelers the chance to enjoy majestic river views for the entire drive.

Ohio`s Amish Country - Scenic Byways of Holmes County- Citizens here 'wilkum' you to the byway and its sites. Enjoy the cultural and recreational treasures around every winding curve and over each countryside hill. The lifestyle here takes you to a bygone era. Your soul may find peace here.

Olentangy Heritage Corridor- Only 10.5 miles long, the Olentangy Heritage Byway is the shortest byway in the state. In its short length, you can experience delightful historical scenery as can be found in the scenic mill district, historic schoolhouses, and historic homes.

Tappan-Moravian Trail Scenic Byway- The Tappan-Moravian Trail Scenic Byway is lovely and history-rich.

Welsh Scenic Byway- The rolling "Welsh Hills" frame this suprisingly varied rural treasure: Amish have recently migrated here; Daniel Boone hunted and trapped in Raccoon Creek; and the city of Gallipolis bears the vestiges of French culture in its historic district.